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Quick Start With Rust

This quick start guide will walk you through the process of installing and using the ReductStore Rust Client SDK to read and write data to a ReductStore instance.

Installing the Rust SDK

To start using the ReductStore Rust SDK, add the following dependency to your Cargo.toml file:

[dependencies]
reduct-rs = "1"

Then, import the reduct-rs crate in your Rust code:

Running ReductStore

If you don't already have a ReductStore instance running, you can easily spin up one as a Docker container. To do this, run the following command:

docker run -p 8383:8383 -e RS_API_TOKEN="my-token" reduct/store:latest

This will start a ReductStore instance listening on port 8383 on your local machine. The RS_API_TOKEN environment variable is used to authenticate requests to the ReductStore instance. You can set it to any value you like, but you will need to use the same value when creating a Client object in your code.

If Docker is not an option, you can also download the ReductStore binaries. Check the Download Page.

Hello World Example

Now when you have the SDK installed and a ReductStore instance running, you can start using the SDK to interact with the ReductStore database. Here is an example of using the SDK to perform basic operations on a ReductStore instance:

use bytes::Bytes;
use futures_util::stream::StreamExt;
use reduct_rs::{QuotaType, ReductClient, ReductError};
use std::pin::pin;
use std::time::{Duration, SystemTime};
use tokio;

#[tokio::main]
async fn main() -> Result<(), ReductError> {
// 1. Create a ReductStore client
let client = ReductClient::builder()
.url("http://127.0.0.1:8383")
.api_token("my-token")
.build();

// 2. Get or create a bucket with 1Gb quota
let bucket = client
.create_bucket("my-bucket")
.quota_type(QuotaType::FIFO)
.quota_size(1_000_000_000)
.exist_ok(true)
.send()
.await?;

// 3. Write some data with timestamps in the 'sensor-1' entry
let start = SystemTime::now();
bucket
.write_record("sensor-1")
.data(Bytes::from_static(b"Record #1"))
.timestamp(start)
.send()
.await?;

bucket
.write_record("sensor-1")
.data(Bytes::from_static(b"Record #2"))
.timestamp(start + Duration::from_secs(1))
.send()
.await?;

// 4. Query the data by time range
let query = bucket
.query("sensor-1")
.start(start)
.stop(start + Duration::from_secs(2))
.send()
.await?;

let mut query = pin!(query);
while let Some(record) = query.next().await {
let record = record?;
println!("Record timestamp: {:?}", record.timestamp());
println!("Record size: {}", record.content_length());
println!("{:?}", record.bytes().await?);
}

// 5. Exit
Ok(())
}

Let's break down what this example is doing.

Creating a Client

Before you can interact with a ReductStore instance, you must create a Client object that represents a connection to the ReductStore instance.

To create a ReductStore client, you can use the ReductClient::builder() method from the reduct_rs crate to create a builder instance. You must pass the URL of the ReductStore server as an argument to the ClientBuilder::new() method. Then, call the build() method on the builder instance to create a Client instance:

let client = ReductClient::builder()
.url("http://127.0.0.1:8383")
.api_token("my-token")
.build();

Creating a Bucket

ReductStore organizes data into buckets, each of which has its own quota and settings. It's a necessary step to create a bucket before writing data to it. You can read more about buckets in the Buckets Guide, but for now, let's just create one.

To create a bucket, you should use the create_bucket method on a Client instance. The method takes the name of the bucket you want to create as an argument and returns a BucketBuilder instance to configure the bucket settings. Call the send method on the BucketBuilder to send the request to the ReductStore server and create the bucket:

let bucket = client
.create_bucket("my-bucket")
.quota_type(QuotaType::FIFO)
.quota_size(1_000_000_000)
.exist_ok(true)
.send()
.await?;

In this example we create a bucket with a FIFO quota of 1GB. This means that the oldest data will be deleted when the bucket reaches 1GB.

Data Ingestion

Time series data is stored in entries within a bucket. An entry is a collection of records with unique timestamps. It must have a unique name within the bucket and usually represents a data source, such as a vibration sensor or a CV camera.

To write a timestamped record to an entry in a bucket, you should use the write_record method on a Bucket instance. Pass the name of the entry you want to write to as an argument. The method will return a RecordBuilder instance to pass the data and timestamp you want to write. Call the send method on the RecordBuilder to send the request to the ReductStore server and write the record:

let start = SystemTime::now();
bucket
.write_record("sensor-1")
.data(Bytes::from_static(b"Record #1"))
.timestamp(start)
.send()
.await?;

bucket
.write_record("sensor-1")
.data(Bytes::from_static(b"Record #2"))
.timestamp(start + Duration::from_secs(1))
.send()
.await?;

This is the simplest case of writing data using the Python SDK. You can also write data in chunks and annotate records with labels. You can find more information and examples in the Data Ingestion Guide.

Data Querying

Usually, we don't read a particular record by its timestamp, but query records in a time range.

To iterate over all records in a given time range, you should use the query method on a bucket instance. Pass the name of the entry to iterate over. The method will return a QueryBuilder instance to specify the time interval. Call the send method on the QueryBuilder to send the request to the ReductStore server and return a stream of records:

let query = bucket
.query("sensor-1")
.start(start)
.stop(start + Duration::from_secs(2))
.send()
.await?;

let mut query = pin!(query);
while let Some(record) = query.next().await {
let record = record?;
println!("Record timestamp: {:?}", record.timestamp());
println!("Record size: {}", record.content_length());
println!("{:?}", record.bytes().await?);
}

The query method has many parameters for filtering and returning sample records. For more information and examples, see the Data Querying Guide.

Next Steps

As you can see to get started with the Client SDK is very easy. However,it doesn't cover all the features of the SDK and the database. Check our Guides to learn more about the ReductStore features and how to use them.